‘SHEP’ Headline Archives

Get Tips on Protecting Your Place of Business at a Free Webinar

Posted on: July 29th, 2016 by Jessica Unger | AFR, SHEP

Hosted by SBA and Agility Recovery

 

WASHINGTON – Recent attacks in office buildings and other public places by assailants armed with deadly weapons have heightened the necessity for an increased focus on security as a vital aspect of business continuity.

 

A crisis unfolding at or near your workplace could put your staff, customers and passersby in danger. And there are many scenarios to consider as reminders of your vulnerability to physical threats. But with careful planning and well-orchestrated drills, your office can be prepared for emergencies by knowing where and how to take shelter inside your building or evacuate efficiently, quickly, and safely.

 

Join Agility Recovery and the U.S. Small Business Administration Wednesday, August 10, for a live online discussion on how to develop both shelter-in place and evacuation plans. Tips will also be shared on how to conduct drills that will protect the safety of your staff, clients, and the community where you do business.

 

The SBA has partnered with Agility Recovery to offer business continuity strategies at its “PrepareMyBusiness” website. Visit www.preparemybusiness.org to access past webinars and to download disaster preparedness checklists.

 

The SBA provides disaster recovery assistance in the form of low-interest loans to homeowners, renters, private nonprofits and businesses of all sizes. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov/disaster.

 

 

WHAT:          “Creating Evacuation & Shelter-In-Place Plans”   
                      
A presentation followed by a question-and-answer session

WHEN:          Wednesday, August 10, 2016 — 2 to 2:30 p.m. ET

HOW:            Space is limited. Register at http://agil.me/SBAevacshelter

 

 

Mapping Maine’s Cultural Institutions

Posted on: December 18th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

The Maine Archives and Museums November Newsletter featured a cover story about the GIS data layer for cultural institutions developed by CERC: Maine (Cultural Emergency Resources Coalition). You can read the full article here.

 

Upcoming Webinar: The Essential Role of Records in Disaster Response

Posted on: July 31st, 2015 by Jessica Unger | AFR, SHEP

On Wed., August 5, 2015, FEMA-Continuity Webinar will present a free, one-hour webinar by David Carmicheal, Pennsylvania State Archivist. David will discuss the role of essential records and essential records maintenance in disaster response and recovery operations.  Additionally, he will explain how to identify essential records before a disaster occurs, as well as outline strategies for protecting essential records during and after disasters.

David is also the author of Implementing the Incident Command System at the Institutional Level: A Handbook for Libraries, Archives, Museums, and other Cultural Institutions.

Host:     FEMA-Continuity Webinar

When:  Wed., August 5, 2015

Time:     2:00 – 3:00 pm Eastern

Connection options for webinar:

1) Webinar (No need to dial into audio conference. Webinar can be heard through computer speakers.)

Go to:   https://share.dhs.gov/aug2015

  • Enter as a guest.
  • Type your FIRST and LAST name.
  • Click “Enter Room.”

2) Audio Conference (Can be used if having trouble hearing webinar through computer speakers. Please dial in prior to the meeting start time.)

While participating in the teleconference, please mute your phone.

  • Audio Conference Dial-In Number: 1-800-320-4330
  • Audio Conference pin: # 164994

Questions? Contact FEMA-Continuity Webinar. For more information, click here.

FEMA Launches Disaster Declaration Data Visualization Tool

Posted on: June 19th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

FEMA data visualization TXFEMA is committed to increasing the transparency and accessibility of data. FEMA recently launched a new data visualization tool that enables the public to see when and where disaster declarations have occurred across the country. With hurricane season underway, the tool helps educate people about the history of hurricanes and other disasters in their communities.

The Public Data Visualization Tool allows users to view and interact with OpenFEMA data. Through an interactive platform, users can view the history of disaster declarations by hazard type or year and financial support provided to states, tribes, and territories, and access public datasets for further research and analysis. This tool builds off of the beta launch in January where users were able to see a visual representation of federal grant data as it relates to fire, preparedness, mitigation, individual assistance, and public assistance. The FEMA data used in the visualization are from the publicly available datasets on www.fema.gov and www.data.gov.

Hurricane Season Is Here!

Posted on: June 16th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

The Eastern Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 through November 30 while the Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 through November 30. As Tropical Storm Bill pounds the Texas coast and moves inland, this second named storm reminds us to become familiar with the hurricane-related notifications issued by the National Weather Service (NWS), including watches and warnings.

  • Hurricane Watch: An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are possible within a specified area. Watches are issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. During a watch, tune in to your NOAA Weather Radio, local radio, or television for information and conduct outside preparedness activities. You can use the America’s PrepareAthon! How to Prepare for a Hurricane Guide for help with storm preparations.
  • Hurricane Warning: An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are expected within a specified area. Warnings are issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. During a warning, complete storm preparations and immediately leave the threatened area if directed by local officials.

Threats from hurricanes include high winds, heavy rainfall, tornadoes, coastal and inland flooding, and storm surge. According to NWS, storm surge produced by hurricanes is one of the greatest threats to life and property along the coast. To learn more about storm surge, take a look at this clip from the National Hurricane Center.

NOAA: Below-normal Atlantic Hurricane Season is likely this year

Posted on: May 27th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center says the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season will likely be below normal, but that’s no reason to believe coastal areas will have it easy.

For the hurricane season, which officially runs from June 1 – November 30, NOAA is predicting a 70% likelihood of 6 to 11 named storms (with winds 39 mph or higher), of which 3 to 6 could become hurricanes (with winds of 74 mph or higher), including 0 to 2 major hurricanes (Category 3 or higher, with winds of 111 mph or higher).

The outlook calls for a 70% chance of a below-normal Atlantic hurricane season, a 20% chance of a near-normal season, and a 10% chance of an above-normal season. The seasonal average for the Atlantic is 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. The NOAA outlook includes Tropical Storm Ana, which formed earlier this month. Pre-season development is not an indicator of the overall season.

NOAA also issued its outlook for the Eastern Pacific and Central Pacific basins. For the Eastern Pacific hurricane basin, NOAA’s 2015 outlook is for a 70% chance of an above-normal hurricane season. That outlook calls for a 70% probability of 15–22 named storms, of which 7–12 are expected to become hurricanes, including 5–8 major hurricanes. For the Central Pacific hurricane basin, NOAA’s outlook is for a 70% chance of an above-normal season with 5–8 tropical cyclones likely.

“It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall in your community to significantly disrupt your life,” said FEMA Deputy Administrator Joseph Nimmich. “Everyone should take action now to prepare themselves and their families for hurricanes and powerful storms. Develop a family communications plan, build an emergency supply kit for your home, and take time to learn evacuation routes for your area. Knowing what to do ahead of time can literally save your life and help you bounce back stronger and faster should disaster strike in your area.”

With the hurricane season officially starting next week, NOAA offers hurricane preparedness tips, along with video and audio public service announcements at www.hurricanes.gov/prepare.

Click here for the full article.

Best Practices Gleaned from the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombings

Posted on: April 15th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

On April 3, 2015, a multi-jurisdictional Project Management Team released the After Action Report for the Response to the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombings. The 130-page report, the product of a year-long process, provides an overview of the incidents that occurred during the week of April 15, 2013; discusses the response activities of public safety, public health, emergency medical, and healthcare communities; and discusses best practices, lessons learned, and areas needing improvement.

While you might think that response activities following the Boston Marathon bombings are a far cry from the emergency preparedness and response goals of the State Heritage Emergency Partnership (SHEP) program, many of the best practices noted in the report are consistent with SHEP’s goals. They include developing and maintaining pre-existing professional relationships, formal mutual aid agreements, and effective collaboration to maintain situational awareness.

The full report is posted here on the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency website.

Free Webinar on College and University Emergency Response Training

Posted on: April 9th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

As part of FEMA’s Emergency Management Higher Education Program, the Emergency Management Institute (EMI) is offering the following webinar:

“In Emergency Response, Great Plans Are a Smart Thing: Training is Everything!”

April 23, 2015
11:00 am – 2:00 pm EDT
Presenter: Bo Mitchell, President/Founder 911 Consulting

Smart plans are critical. But, if we don’t get the words off the paper and into people’s heads, we have failed. Thus, training is everything given that people can’t and won’t run to look at binders for response in a real emergency. What are the legal requirements for training? What are the current practices and obstacles on campuses regarding training? What are the proven ways to train for emergency response? How does your campus compare?

Learning Objectives:

  1. What are the laws, regulations and standards that control emergency plan training?
  2. How will lawsuits affect you and your campus?
  3. What are – versus what should be – the overriding attitude of administrators in training employees in emergency response?
  4. What are the obstacles and consistent mistakes administrations make in emergency training?
  5. Do we need to train the Emergency Team differently than the rest of employees?
  6. How to protect your administration?

Conference Number: 800-320-4330
Participant Code: 316172

To join the meeting: https://fema.connectsolutions.com/he/

For additional information, contact Lillian Virgil, Chief, Mitigation Branch, Emergency Management Institute, Lillian.Virgil@fema.dhs.gov or call 301-447-1490.

 

Prepare for MayDay 2015: Join the Movement!

Posted on: April 7th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

The Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) is proud to carry on Heritage Preservation’s MayDay initiative encouraging libraries, museums, archives, historical societies, and preservation organizations to set aside May 1, 2015, to examine and increase their preparedness for emergencies.

Any organization can participate in MayDay. Last year staff at the Snowden Library of Lycoming College in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, reviewed basic first aid procedures with their department of safety and security, updated their disaster plan, and created a Pocket Response Plan; at the Historic Fourth Ward School Museum in Virginia City, Nevada, staff, volunteers, and interns met to discuss possible emergency situations, reviewed and updated their emergency manual, and made sure all personnel clearly understood the steps to be taken in various emergencies; and the Worthington Historical Society in Worthington, Ohio, developed a system for labeling their collections according to high, medium, and low priority in the event of an emergency to share with staff, volunteers, and local emergency personnel.

Visit FAIC’s MayDay page to view project ideas and the MayDay logo.

Activities hosted by FAIC for MayDay 2015 are sponsored by Polygon Group, offering document recovery, emergency planning services, property damage restoration, and temporary humidity control across the globe.

The Society of American Archivists (SAA) created the MayDay initiative in 2006 and promoted the idea to its members and allied organizations. The following year, the Heritage Emergency National Task Force and SAA expanded the concept to include all kinds of collecting institutions and historic preservation interests. For more information about SAA’s MayDay activities, click here.

About FAIC

FAIC, the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works, supports conservation education, research, and outreach activities that increase understanding of our global cultural heritage.

FEMA Releases New State Mitigation Plan Review Guide

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Jessica Unger | SHEP

FEMA recently announced the release of the new State Mitigation Plan Review Guide (“Guide”). The updated Guide clarifies federal regulations that apply to FEMA; policy; and guidance around state hazard mitigation plan for state agencies and other officials developing mitigation plans. The Guide helps ensure a consistent plan review process for FEMA and the states that aim to improve the analysis and integration of evolving risks, such as climate change. The Guide will go into effect in approximately one year on March 6, 2016, for all state mitigation plans submitted to FEMA for review and approval. The transitional period allows time for FEMA and the states to work together to support their familiarity and understanding of the updated Guide. Indian tribal governments should follow the Tribal Multi-Hazard Mitigation Planning Guidance.

We bring this to your attention because states will need to take a holistic approach and include not only emergency management, but also the sectors of economic development, land use and development, housing, health and social services, infrastructure, and natural and cultural resources, in their planning process and mitigation program, where practicable.

(more…)